WHAT WE CAN

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do
tempor incididunt ut labore et

The service traces its history to an online service known as PlayNET, which hosted multi-player games for the Commodore 64. PlayNET licensed their software to a new service, Quantum Link (Q-Link), who went online in November 1985. PlayNET shut down shortly thereafter. The initial Q-Link service was similar to the original PlayNET, but over time Q-Link added many new services. When a new IBM PC client was released.


The company focussed on the non-gaming services and launched it under the name America Online. The original Q-Link was shut down on November 1, 1995, while AOL grew to become the largest online service, displacing established players like CompuServe and The Source. By 1995, AOL had about 20 million active users

OUR SERVICES

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do
tempor incididunt ut labore et

Service 1

Services1 Yahoo! is a web services provider headquartered in Sunnyvale, California and owned by Verizon Media. The original Yahoo...

Service 2

Services1 Yahoo! is a web services provider headquartered in Sunnyvale, California and owned by Verizon Media. The original Yahoo...

Service 3

Services1 Yahoo! is a web services provider headquartered in Sunnyvale, California and owned by Verizon Media. The original Yahoo...

support

Avg Supports

1-xxx-xxx-xxxx

Today, the U.S. Soccer Foundation is featured on the “Make a Difference” module, on the AOL.com homepage! Every day, one non-profit from around the country is featured on AOL.com and given the opportunity to showcase their work to a large audience.

OUR VALUES

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do
tempor incididunt ut labore et

AOL began in 1983, as a short-lived venture called Control Video Corporation (or CVC), founded by William von Meister. Its sole product was an online service called GameLine for the Atari 2600 video game console, after von Meister’s idea of buying music on demand was rejected by Warner Bros.[6] Subscribers bought a modem from the company for US$49.95 and paid a one-time US$15 setup fee. GameLine permitted subscribers to temporarily download games and keep track of high scores, at a cost of US$1 per game.[7] The telephone disconnected and the downloaded game would remain in GameLine’s Master Module and playable until the user turned off the console or downloaded another game